• Local GAPs

Slide Show

August 2019 news and update

1. Conserving Herefordshire’s Ice Age Ponds

We have now finished our site surveying and training for the development stage of the project.  With the help of many dedicated volunteers we have completed surveys of 35 ponds, and have partial surveys of another 10 ponds.  Many of these are on sites we didn’t know about before the project began.  Many more ponds have also been reported by keen volunteers, we have a big list of these that we are saving until we hear about the next stage of funding.

If you have attended one of our training days but haven’t received your copy of “Kettle hole ponds survey method manual” please can you get in touch with Beth on e.andrews@worc.ac.uk and we can make sure one gets posted out to you.

We are also in the process of sorting out a visit with some experts take some core samples of a few of our sites.  We haven’t finalised the dates and locations for these visits but it is likely to be towards the end of August.  If you are interested in coming along and finding out about how these longer (could be over 8m of sediment) cores are taken and seeing the experts at work then please let Beth know (e.andrews@worc.ac.uk) and you can be emailed the dates once they are finalised.

I want to say a huge “Thank you” to everyone who has been involved so far.  We have collected a huge amount of data in a very short time, often in less than ideal weather on many less than ideal sites.  We couldn’t have done it without you, so thank you.

Beth Andrews


2. Rare Exposures of Worcestershire River Terraces

Trust members and friends provided much practical support to a field trip connected with the quadrennial congress of the International Union for Quaternary Research INQUA. A Site of Special Scientific Importance (SSSI) section at Eckington near Pershore was re-excavated by permission of Natural England at the request of Professor David Bridgland (Durham University).

Dick Bryant, Kay Hughes, Alan Hughes and Roger Hunt worked with David to clear a jungle of brambles as well as soil and slope wash in advance of the trip. John Payne and Dick re-exposed the section in sweltering 32 degree heat on the day of the INQUA trip and re-covered it the following morning.  The site is a rare example of a river deposit from the last interglacial, about 125,000 years ago, which was slightly warmer than today and sea level was 6 m higher. Although humans were absent, a hippopotamus tooth was previously found at Eckington, characteristic of this time period.  In 2019, a possible rhinoceros tooth was uncovered as well as much broken up calcareous shelly material.

At the end of the international trip, scientists from Durham took some pebble samples for dating using the OSL technique which requires sampling in the dark – hence the hump in the covering sheet in the photo!

Another temporary river terrace exposure of the Worcester terrace from the last ice age was created by works near the River Severn at Bevere, north Worcester as observed by Brian and Kay Hughes.  However 5 days later, the section had all but disappeared behind iron pilings.

 

3. Support EHT through the **NEW** Worcester Lottery

The Worcester Community Lottery has just been launched by Worcester City Council and the EHT is one of its good causes. Half of the value of tickets sold through our page comes directly to us, with another 10% distributed to other local causes. One in 50 tickets wins a prize, with a prize maximum of £25,000.

So if you feel like a flutter on the lottery, please support the EHT by visiting our web page on the Worcester Lottery site:

https://www.worcesterlottery.org/support/herefordshire-worcestershire-earth-heritage-trust

You are invited to buy tickets on a weekly basis at one pound each, with a minimum commitment of one month (five tickets) and can cancel at any time after that. Good luck!

 

4. Champions Day in the Malvern Hills – Sunday 21st July

This year’s Champions Day took the form of a two part field visit to the Malvern Hills, hosted by Tank and North Quarry Champion, Richard Edwards.  Champions from the two counties, along with other guests from the EHT and associated organisations met in North Quarry beside the Malvern Hills Trust notice board.

Richard explained how he had tried to ensure that this board contained a substantial amount of geological information.  In the end, it contained less than he’d hoped for, but a small amount of information is better than none! Our thanks go out to Richard for his tireless work to raise geological awareness not only in Tank Quarry, but by including North Quarry in clearance work and new signage which he has initiated in both quarries over the last few years.

Richard gave us detailed handouts, and took us to look at the excellent exposure of the East Malvern Fault in the wall of the quarry.  The rock face was cleared a few years ago as a part of the ongoing clearance programme in the Malvern Hills led by John Payne. Through Richard’s initiative there is now an interpretation board at this site. The exposed rocks all belong to the Malverns complex (around 677 Ma) and we could see evidence of the fault in features such as slickensides, and fault breccia.

Moving on to Tank Quarry, the fruits of Richard’s labours were revealed in a superb display of boulders representing some of the principal rock types to be found in the Malvern Hills, plus a replacement for the original Champions display panel with more information.  Some recent clearance work and judicious use of an angle grinder enabled us to see some detail in the exposed rocks, including a fine exposure of a granite sill and a polished surface of the surrounding amphibolite.

Richard had a ‘secret’ store of hand specimens for us to examine, which added to the wealth of interest in this significant Champions site – certainly containing the best and most varied geological interpretation in all the Malvern Hills.

We thanked Richard for a very interesting and informative morning session and then headed for British Camp car park for the start of the afternoon session, led by Adrian Wyatt. Adrian is a member of the Lickey Hills Geo-Champions group, and a regular volunteer with EHT activities in the Malvern Hills and elsewhere.

Adrian outlined the afternoon programme which started with a climb to the summit of Herefordshire Beacon for a well-earned rest and lunch.  Here we were in the heart of the Malverns complex.  We were lucky to have clear views in all directions, and Adrian pointed out the significant features visible from here; the Silurian ridges and valleys to the west, the Triassic basin and Jurassic Cotswolds to the east, and the faulting which has offset Herefordshire Beacon from the Malvern ridge to the north.

From the summit we moved southwards towards Broad Down to see two contrasted exposures in the younger Warren House Formation (c.570Ma), the first of basaltic composition and the second of pinkish coloured rhyolite.  Then we moved down over Hangman’s Hill and to the west where Adrian had found a tiny Silurian exposure from the May Hill Sandstone Group, to the delight of the assembled company.  This was in the correct location on the geology map, but very hard to find due to the endless encroachment of vegetation.

We returned via Clutter’s Cave to see the basalt pillow lavas in the Warren House formation, and the day ended around 4.00 back in British Camp car park. Adrian was thanked for stepping in to lead us through a very interesting afternoon session, concluding a varied and action-packed day out in the Malvern Hills.

For more information about the Malvern Hills and the Champions Project, please visit the Champions website: https://ehtchampions.org.uk/ and go to the pages for the 4 Malvern Hills sites: Tank, Dingle, Westminster Bank and Gardiners quarries. The original Champions booklet for the Malverns is now available in pdf format to view or download from any of those pages.

Julie Schroder (EHT Champions Co-ordinator)


5. Geofest 2019:  25th May to 1st September 2019

What’s On in The Geopark?

There are lots of Guided Walks, Children’s Activities, Tours, Exhibitions, Workshops and much more across parts of Shropshire, Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire – Fun for all the family. More events and details on website www.geopark.org.uk

 

Upcoming Events

6. Fortis Summer Fun Days – Call for Volunteers

You are invited to join us at the Fortis Summer Fun Days as follows:

  • Martins Way in Ledbury on Friday 16th August-  1.30-3.30 pm

If you would like to volunteer at one of the above events, helping out with selling trail guides and merchandise or running a children’s activity, please let us know by contacting Allison at eht@worc.ac.uk or calling the office on 01905 855184. Thank you, your help is much appreciated.

 

7. WGCG Lecture Programme: 2019

Meetings are held on Wednesdays (usually 3rd of the month) and start at 7.30 p.m. in St Francis Church Hall, 110 Warwick Road, Kenilworth, CV8 1HL unless otherwise stated. Tea / coffee and biscuits are available beforehand from 7.00 p.m.  Please check the WGCG website for any late, unforeseeable changes at http://www.wgcg.co.uk/talks/

  • Wednesday 18th September 2019: Jurassic Sedimentation in Yorkshire with Andy Howards 7 -9 pm.

 

8. Teme Valley Geological Society (TVGS) Talks

Please find details of forthcoming TVGS evening talks held in Martley Memorial Hall (MMH). Talks commence at 7.30pm, fees are £3 for non-members and £1 for members.

  • Monday 16th September 2019: Members evening.

For further information of the TVGS please visit www.geo-village.eu

 

9. Malvern U3A Geology Group

The Malvern U3A Geology Group meets on the 2nd Wednesday of the month at the Cube, Malvern, from 10.00 – 12.00 am. The entrance price is: £2.00.

For further information please see website: www.malvernu3a.org.uk/geology3/

For people who are members of the Malvern U3A and would like to develop skills which could be useful in identifying items below ground, there is now an Introduction to Dowsing group within Malvern U3A.

The group is run by Ced Jackson who set up Malvern Dowsers (now 10 years old), and meets once a month on a Tuesday afternoon in Malvern.  For more information please contact Info@CedJackson.org (01684 560265).

 

10. Woolhope Club

The Woolhope Club Geology Section meetings to be held in the “Woolhope Room” of the Library in Broad Street Hereford at 6.00pm for 6.30pm until 8.00pm. For further information of the Woolhope Club please visit www.woolhopeclub.org.uk

  • Friday 27th September 2019 – Paul Gannon on Snowdonia.

 

  • Friday 25th October 2019- To be arranged.

 

  • Saturday 2nd November 2019- Geologists Association (GA) Festival at University College London (UCL). Woolhope Club Members are most welcome. Note Saturday meeting.

 

  • Friday 22nd November 2019 – Paul Olver: A Tale of Five Magmas: A Review of Planetary volcanism.

 

  • Friday 13th December 2019 – Members’ Rock/Fossil Festival plus drinks in a nearby pub.

 

 

11. Black Country Geological Society (BCGS) Programme

BCGS indoor meetings are held at the Dudley Archives, Tipton Road, Dudley, DY1 4SQ with a 7.30 for 8.00 pm start unless stated otherwise. Visitors welcome, but there will be a charge of £1.00. For further details please see the website: http://bcgs.info

 

If you have anything you would like to include in our next monthly update please forward to eht@worc.ac.uk by 3rd September 2019.

Herefordshire and Worcestershire Earth Heritage Trust, Geological Records Centre,

University of Worcester, Henwick Grove, Worcester, WR2 6AJ.

Tel: 01905 855184, Email: eht@worc.ac.uk

 

July 2019 news and update

1. Conserving Herefordshire’s Ice Age Ponds

We are now half way through our pond surveys and the team is busy completing the application to the National Lottery Heritage Fund for the delivery stage funding.  Thank you to everyone who has joined us so far, we have completed 25 pond surveys to date – including one in 30 degrees and another few in pouring rain.  The data that you have helped gather is being used to learn more about the Ice Age Ponds in Herefordshire and to help us write some more detailed site management plans.  It is also great evidence for our funding bid too.

Here are the dates and locations for our last few pond survey days in July.

  • Thursday 18th July – Moccas Park
  • Thursday 25th July – Lower House Orchard, Staunton-on-Wye
  • Saturday 27th July – TBC

All equipment will be provided and if you haven’t been on our previous training courses then full training will be given too.

To book your place please email e.andrews@worc.ac.uk.

We are also in the process of sorting out a visit with Dr Warren Eastwood from Birmingham University to take some core samples of a few of our sites.  We haven’t finalised the dates and locations for these visits but it is likely to be towards the end of August.  If you are interested in coming along and finding out about how these longer (could be over 8m of sediment) cores are taken and seeing the experts at work then please let Beth know (e.andrews@worc.ac.uk) and you can be emailed the dates once they are finalised.

 

2. EHT Map Database Training Day

We will be holding a Map Database Training day on Wednesday 7th August 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The Earth Heritage Trust has a potentially valuable tool - a spatial database of locations created by trustee Mike Brooks..  You can find it at http://hwgeosites.co.uk. [the site works with PCs but not with tablets;  you have to click on the "Flash" icon to make the map appear].  It has been populated with many designated sites, but there is still much to do including adding photographs.  The database could also be used to add other sets of data – for example the U3A group documenting sites in the Malverns are considering whether it could be used to display the data that they are gathering as a separate set of data.  Such a spatial database proved very valuable for the recent Building Stones project.

If you are interested in learning more, we are holding a training day on 7th August led by Ella Young with an afternoon of practical work and opportunities to discuss the development of the database with its author Mike Brooks and other EHT staff.  Please respond to Allison at eht@worc.ac.uk by 2nd August 2019.

If you are interested in attending please contact Allison Tinsley at eht@worc.ac.uk by 2nd August 2019 indicating if you will bring your own laptop and if you want to focus on practical exercises or on a particular local place.

 

3. Geofest 2019:  25th May to 1st September 2019

What’s On in The Geopark?

There are lots of Guided Walks, Children’s Activities, Tours, Exhibitions, Workshops and much more across parts of Shropshire, Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire – Fun for all the family. More events and details on website www.geopark.org.uk

 

4. Annual General Meeting

The AGM was held on 8th June at the Talbot, Knightwick. The meeting heard a report from the chair, most of which is printed in the Annual Review, an electronic version of which was sent out in mid-June.  There are a limited number of hard copies in colour available for £1 (plus postage) and you can also find the review on our website.  David Pamment presented the financial report, which was commended for its clarity by the meeting. The meeting re-elected Ian Fairchild and Peter Stevens and elected Peter Bridges at Trustees.  Julie Harrald has stepped down as Trustee to give herself the opportunity to do a secondment project with us, during her PhD, about Natural Capital which is how government is valuing the natural environment. Julie wants to establish guidelines for how geoheritage can be valued in this way. More of this in due course.

Following the AGM, Dick Bryant and Ian Fairchild led a group of 17 people on a local geowalk.

Knightwick is in an interesting position at the intersection of the Malvern line with the Teme Valley and on the river bank Dick explained various theories about the history of the drainage during the progressive erosion of the landscape and in relation to glaciation and glacial lakes in particular.

The Teme Valley Geological Society have expressed interest in doing some work on the river terraces to help solve the mystery about when and how the Teme changed its flow direction from westward-flowing (as seen in higher terraces near Tenbury Wells) to eastward-flowing (a river capture event), and some more background is given in the Annual Review. No terraces are visible from Knightwick, but examples are shown on the map in the Annual Review.

The party then walked to the western end of Osebury Rock across the valley at the foot of which Dick pointed out the toe of an alluvial fan at the outlet of the side valley.  Permission to examine the outcrop at Osebury Rock had been given by Natural England and the landowner Martin Cross of Coles Farm, Lulsley.

Steep crags of stratified breccia are well-exposed, indicating intermittent water flow on an alluvial fan.

John Payne demonstrated the occurrence of ventifacts – wind-faceted pebbles (also known as dreikanter) indicating the aridity of the depositional setting.  The age of this outcrop has been controversial.  Originally it was grouped with various outcrops of breccias of late Carboniferous or early Permian age (Haffield Breccia), but the remapping of the area by the BGS led to reassignment to the Triassic by analogy with basal breccia facies beneath sandstones in the Worcester Graben.  John Payne pointed out that Osebury Rock was just east of a major fault to the west of which are Silurian strata.  The older breccias are not known east of this fault which strengthens the Triassic interpretation.

The group then examined small outcrops of breccia in the fields to the west of Osebury Rock.  Here there is an obscure, partly faulted contact with red sandstones.  These were originally assigned to the Permian, but now regarded as Triassic, directly overlying the Osebury outcrops.  In the lane cutting near the top of the hill on the Alfrick road, cross-bedding is seen, presumably of fluvial origin.

The party then walked down the lane to Lulsley, stopping just short to view the Teme Valley to the east within which there is a distinct terrace, the lowest (and youngest) found in the valley.  One-metre contours from Lidar data help to mark the terrace which is just 2 m above the modern floodplain and probably formed in post-glacial times.

To the north west of Lulsley Court is an open stretch of floodplain bounding the Teme.  From here there are splendid views of landslips in Triassic rocks across the valley to Ankerdine Hill.  Occasionally the A44 has been blocked by landslip events as in 2007.  Dick pointed out that the river capture event led to more rapid downcutting of the Teme and this would have led to steeper, more unstable hillsides, promoting landslips which are shown also in the Silurian beds on the southern margins of Ankerdine Hill.

 

5. Call for Volunteer with Knowledge of Website Design

At its March meeting the EHT Board resolved to renew our website to make it fit for our purposes in the future.  We envisage that the technical work will be sent out to tender as a project, but it is important for the EHT to guide this process by being clear about what it wants as well as providing content in appropriate formats.

We are setting up a small group chaired by Mike Brooks to guide this process and are seeking a volunteer with experience in website design to help us define the parameters for the tender and select the successful applicant.  If you are interested please contact the EHT office by email to eht@worc.ac.uk or call 01905 855184. Thank you.

 

6. Support EHT through the **NEW** Worcester Lottery

The Worcester Community Lottery has just been launched by Worcester City Council and the EHT is one of its good causes. Half of the value of tickets sold through our page comes directly to us, with another 10% distributed to other local causes. One in 50 tickets wins a prize, with a prize maximum of £25,000.

So if you feel like a flutter on the lottery, please support the EHT by visiting our web page on the Worcester Lottery site:

https://www.worcesterlottery.org/support/herefordshire-worcestershire-earth-heritage-trust

You are invited to buy tickets on a weekly basis at one pound each, with a minimum commitment of one month (five tickets) and can cancel at any time after that. Good luck!

 

Events

7. Science in the Park 2019  – a great success

On Saturday 29th June 2019, EHT had a stand at the Science in the Park event, located in Priory Park, Malvern. Displaying minerals and fossil specimens, with children’s activities including dig a treasure and the dinosaur detective trail  a busy day was had by all and a substantial amount raised by selling merchandise and trail guides.

Many thanks for all those who volunteered and helped out on the day.

 

Upcoming Events

8. Fortis Summer Fun Days – Call for Volunteers

You are invited to join us at the Fortis Summer Fun Days as follows:

  • Dukes Meadow in Malvern on Friday 26th July 2019 – 1.30 -3.30 pm
  • Martins Way in Ledbury on Friday 16th August-  1.30-3.30 pm

If you would like to volunteer at one of the above events, helping out with selling trail guides and merchandise or running a children’s activity, please let us know by contacting Allison at eht@worc.ac.uk or calling the office on 01905 855184. Thank you, your help is much appreciated.

 

9. WGCG Lecture Programme: 2019

Meetings are held on Wednesdays (usually 3rd of the month) and start at 7.30 p.m. in St Francis Church Hall, 110 Warwick Road, Kenilworth, CV8 1HL unless otherwise stated. Tea / coffee and biscuits are available beforehand from 7.00 p.m.  Please check the WGCG website for any late, unforeseeable changes at http://www.wgcg.co.uk/talks/

Friday 12th July 2019: Malvern Hills Walk with Dick Bryant.

  • Wednesday 18th September 2019: Jurassic Sedimentation in Yorkshire with Andy Howards 7 -9 pm.

 

10. Teme Valley Geological Society (TVGS) Talks

Please find details of forthcoming TVGS evening talks held in Martley Memorial Hall (MMH). Talks commence at 7.30pm, fees are £3 for non-members and £1 for members.

  • Monday 16th September 2019: Members evening.

For further information of the TVGS please visit www.geo-village.eu

 

11. Malvern U3A Geology Group

The Malvern U3A Geology Group meets on the 2nd Wednesday of the month at the Cube, Malvern, from 10.00 – 12.00 am. The entrance price is: £2.00.

For further information please see website: www.malvernu3a.org.uk/geology3/

 

For people who are members of the Malvern U3A and would like to develop skills which could be useful in identifying items below ground, there is now an Introduction to Dowsing group within Malvern U3A.

The group is run by Ced Jackson who set up Malvern Dowsers (now 10 years old), and meets once a month on a Tuesday afternoon in Malvern.  For more information please contact Info@CedJackson.org (01684 560265).

 

12. Woolhope Club

The Woolhope Club Geology Section meetings to be held in the “Woolhope Room” of the Library in Broad Street Hereford at 6.00pm for 6.30pm until 8.00pm. For further information of the Woolhope Club please visit www.woolhopeclub.org.uk

  • Friday 27th September 2019 – Paul Gannon on Snowdonia.
  • Friday 25th October 2019- To be arranged.
  • Saturday 2nd November 2019- Geologists Association (GA) Festival at University College London (UCL). Woolhope Club Members are most welcome. Note Saturday meeting.
  • Friday 22nd November 2019 – Paul Olver: A Tale of Five Magmas: A Review of Planetary volcanism.
  • Friday 13th December 2019 – Members’ Rock/Fossil Festival plus drinks in a nearby pub.

 

13. Black Country Geological Society (BCGS) Programme

BCGS indoor meetings are held at the Dudley Archives, Tipton Road, Dudley, DY1 4SQ with a 7.30 for 8.00 pm start unless stated otherwise. Visitors welcome, but there will be a charge of £1.00. For further details please see the website: http://bcgs.info

 

  • Sunday 28th July 2019: (Field Meeting) Nottingham’s Sandstone Caves 10.45am – 4.00pm.  Nottingham’s Sandstone Caves, led by Tony Waltham. (Engineering geologist and karst specialist). Meet at 10.45am at bollards at the west end of Cliff Road, Nottingham, NG1 1GZ. Nearest car park is Lace Market Car Park, Pilcher Gate, NG1 1QE (about 100 yards to the north). Enter caves at 11.00am. The tour will take around one and a half hours. Please do not be late. Anyone arriving after 11.00am will not be able to join the cave tour. Numbers limited to 20. Helmets not needed. Torches needed for some parts. The caves are not suitable for wheelchairs or young children. Afterwards we will have a walk through the town to the Tunnel and Castle Rock, with a possible walk via the Church cemetery, time permitting. Aim to finish around 4.00pm.

 

If you have anything you would like to include in our next monthly update please forward to eht@worc.ac.uk by 30th July 2019.

Herefordshire and Worcestershire Earth Heritage Trust, Geological Records Centre,

University of Worcester, Henwick Grove, Worcester, WR2 6AJ.

Tel: 01905 855184, Email: eht@worc.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 2019 news and update

1. Conserving Herefordshire’s Ice Age Ponds

Thank you to all the volunteers who came along to one of our training sessions, learning how to identify and survey Kettle Hole Ponds.  Don’t worry if you missed out on these, there is still time to get involved with this exciting project.

We are now gearing up for a busy summer of pond surveying at many sites across western Herefordshire.  Whether you have completed the training sessions, or not, we would love you to join us at one of our survey days during June and July.

June dates and locations are:

Friday 14th June – Mowley Wood, Staunton-on-Wye

Friday 21st June – Norton Canon area

Saturday 29th June – The Sturts Nature Reserve, Eardisley

July dates are below.  The locations will be confirmed soon.

Thursday 18th July – TBC

Thursday 25th July – TBC

Saturday 27th July – TBC

All equipment will be provided and if you haven’t been on our previous training courses then full training will be given too.

To book your place please email e.andrews@worc.ac.uk.

 

2. EHT Training Day

A local geological research and maps training day will be held on Tuesday 18th June at the EHT offices, University of Worcester St. Johns Campus.

We have arranged a repeat of the popular maps’ training day that was run twice in February.  It will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., costs £10 and you will be provided with paper copies of the slides. You are encouraged to bring your own laptop if you wish, but a computer will be provided otherwise. The workshop will cover the following topics with time for practical experience:

  • Use of publicly available geological mapping resources via the BGS.
  • Use of publicly available ordnance survey maps via OS open data.
  • Demonstrate the Trust’s comprehensive map coverage of the two counties.
  • Demonstrate the publications database and how to retrieve relevant research articles.
  • Demonstrate Trust collections of field photographs and project reports.
  • Additional resources available under supervision of Trust staff (for educational purposes under Trust auspices) in Edina Digimap.  This includes Ordnance Survey maps, historical OS maps, geological maps, aerial photographs and Lidar.
  • Database of Local Geological Sites and complementary data held in the archives (e.g. management plans, details of sites).
  • We will demonstrate the capabilities of using a Geographic Information System (GIS) to display and manipulate map information. (Given sufficient interest, it is planned to offer some GIS training in the autumn).

If you are interested in attending please contact Allison Tinsley at eht@worc.ac.uk indicating if you will bring your own laptop and if you want to focus on practical exercises or on a particular local place.

 

3. Recent Discoveries in the Lickey Hills

The Lower Ordovician Lickey Quartzite is well-known for its lack of fossils.  It is interpreted as a near-shore sand flat facies: as such it would have suffered bioturbation, wave agitation and twice-daily scouring by tidal currents.  These processes, combined with predation and scavenging would quickly remove any potential fossils.  It is worth remembering that, ‘absence of evidence is not evidence of absence’, and in many cases biologically active environments frequently have a very low potential for preserving fossil remains.  However, it would be mere speculation to suggest that the environment in which the sands of the Lickey Quartzite were deposited supported any kind of biota without some tangible evidence.

On a recent Geo-Champions ‘research walk’ I identified a single bedding plane that preserves the paired burrow openings of Diplocraterion.  While no cross-sections of the U-shaped burrows have been observed, the more or less consistent spacing of the pairs of openings supports this interpretation.

To date, these trace fossils constitute the only evidence we have of the life that inhabited the Ordovician environment of the Lickey area.  Their absence from other beds suggests that in this instance they were preserved by an unusual event, in which a sudden inundation of sediment preserved the burrows without disrupting them.

When I was first shown the Lickey Quartzite at the summit of Bilberry Hill, it seemed incongruous.  Unlike the other exposures in this formation, much of the rock at this location was a poorly sorted monomict breccia of quartzite fragments strongly bonded by a silica cement.  There was debate as to whether the rocks were truly outcrop or displaced boulders, and speculation about the origin of the breccia.  As it was assumed that this exposure must be close to the supposed hinge of the ‘Lickey Anticline’, it was suggested that the fragmentation could be associated with folding of the rock.  However, more intense folding is seen in the Barnt Green Road Quarry, without the development of this type of brecciation.  If the origin was structural, it was more likely to be fault-related.  The other possibility was a sedimentary origin.

When the group recently undertook a ‘research walk’ along the length of the Lickey Ridge, I was struck by the fact that the unconformity seen at the Rubery Cutting rises southwards towards Bilberry Hill.  It occurred to me that if the unconformable surface preserved a Silurian landscape with significant relief, the only source of sediment on the high points would be the Lickey Quartzite itself, and that the Bilberry Hill breccia might be sitting on the same unconformity as the Silurian Rubery Sandstone.

On the 26 May, a group of Lickey Hills Geo-Champions undertook a clearance of the site.  Malcolm Coghill, David Green, Ken Lewis, Julie Schroder, Adrian Wyatt and I spent a fruitful three hours excavating, cleaning and discussing.  We noted many contacts between breccia and unbrecciated Lickey Quartzite, in a variety of orientations, but most significantly, we unearthed a clear easterly-dipping unconformity between the two units.  It is seen in outcrop, and its continuation can be traced in a detached slab that has fallen without any horizontal displacement.

We therefore conclude that the breccia is of Silurian age, more or less contemporaneous with the Rubery Sandstone, and reflects deposition of weathered fragments of Lickey Quartzite on a topographical high spot, beyond the reach of the encroaching Silurian sea.  This would suggest that the Lickey Ridge may have had an earlier existence in the Lower Palaeozoic.  The fact that the breccia lacks the extensive jointing that characterises the Lickey Quartzite may suggest that folding of the quartzite took place in the Ordovician, prior to the development of the unconformity.

Beneath the surrounding thin soil layer lies a white deposit of very fine sand and silt, which contains occasional well-rounded frosted grains, and embedded fragments of quartzite and breccia.  This unsorted detritus is clearly derived from the outcrop, and may be the consequence of weathering under periglacial conditions.

As a footnote, the clearance was greatly enhanced by the use of a portable pressure washer – the WORX Hydroshot.  A 40 litre Aquaroll was used to take water to the site, and two freshly recharged batteries in the Hydroshot proved more than adequate to exhaust the water supply.

Alan Richardson

 

4. Geofest 2019

What’s On in The Geopark?

The Geofest is running from 25th May to 1st September 2019

There are lots of Guided Walks, Children’s Activities, Tours, Exhibitions, Workshops and much more across parts of Shropshire, Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire – Fun for all the family. More events and details on website www.geopark.org.uk


5. Climate walk

Marie-Pierre Leroux is doing an MSc project at Hereford College of Arts about the effects of the Anthropocene (humans) on soils in Herefordshire.  She is using a variety of art work, drama and other imaginative ways to portray this.  There are some events lists below.  One really interesting event is a walk involving a game about the Climate Walk at Kinnersley.  People are asked questions which direct the route they move along and the effect that they have on climate change.  Their decisions will determine where they end up.  Marie-Pierre would like anyone interested to be involved.

  • A Climate Walk at the Kinnersley Arms on Saturday 29 June from 2 pm to 3.30 pm.

We walk in small groups from June 29th to the year 2099. Along the way, a combination of the choices we make and blind chance will decide the climate of 2099 for each group. At the end, we’ll compare our surprising journeys, and see how we feel about the unexpected world we have ended up in.

  • The Herefordshire Word-Hoard launch event with readings at the cider museum (HR4 0EF) on Friday 28 June. The start time is at 6.30 pm. We will invite you and others to contribute terms and expressions connected to local soil and its produce, earth and landscape. The project will run through July & August 2019. Words will be selected for publication in an expanded word-hoard.
  • A Climate Walk at The Maylord Orchard shopping centre on Saturday 20 July from 2 pm to 3.30 pm.
  • Voicing Herefordshire Soil in the Anthropocene, an installation which will be part of the MA fine art final show running from 20 to 26 July. The launch event is on 19 July at the Maylord Orchard shopping centre (time tbc). This should include an edited version of your interview.

For further information, please email the project leader, Marie-Pierre, on:

mp95leroux@hotmail.com booking in advance is not necessary, but it is helpful to know rough numbers.

 

6. NEW Geopark Way Visitor Guide for 2019 – available now on EHT Website

An Updated visitor guide to accompany the newly released Geopark Way Guide is now available. The visitor guide is designed to help you plan your trip along the Geopark Way. You will find information on all places to stay and places to eat along the length of the trail and details of public transport and alternative ways to explore the Geopark Way.

You can download this from the following page on the H&W Earth Heritage Trust website: http://www.earthheritagetrust.org/pub/category/the-geopark-way/the-trail-guide/

 

7. Call for Volunteer with Knowledge of Website Design

At its March meeting the EHT Board resolved to renew our website to make it fit for our purposes in the future.  We envisage that the technical work will be sent out to tender as a project, but it is important for the EHT to guide this process by being clear about what it wants as well as providing content in appropriate formats.

We are setting up a small group chaired by Mike Brooks to guide this process and are seeking a volunteer with experience in website design to help us define the parameters for the tender and select the successful applicant.  If you are interested please contact the EHT office by email to eht@worc.ac.uk or call 01905 855184. Thank you.

 

8. Support EHT through the **NEW** Worcester Lottery

The Worcester Community Lottery has just been launched by Worcester City Council and the EHT is one of its good causes. Half of the value of tickets sold through our page comes directly to us, with another 10% distributed to other local causes. One in 50 tickets wins a prize, with a prize maximum of £25,000.

So if you feel like a flutter on the lottery, please support the EHT by visiting our web page on the Worcester Lottery site:

https://www.worcesterlottery.org/support/herefordshire-worcestershire-earth-heritage-trust

You are invited to buy tickets on a weekly basis at one pound each, with a minimum commitment of one month (five tickets) and can cancel at any time after that. Good luck!

 

Upcoming Events

9. Digital Festival 2019 – Call for Volunteers

The EHT will have a Deep Time stand at the Digital Festival on Thursday 27th June 2019 at the Hive, displaying the Deep Time apps. If you would like to volunteer please let us know, you don’t need experience of using apps on iPads or smart phones, just a friendly and approachable manner. Thank you.

 

10. Science in the Park 2019 – Call for Volunteers

On Saturday 29th June 2019, EHT will have a stand at Science in the Park, located in Priory Park, Malvern. We will have rock specimens, children’s activities and will be selling merchandise and trail guides. If you would like to volunteer please let Allison know in the office. Hope to see you there. Many thanks.

 

11. Temporary Exhibition on Ocean Deep-Sea Drilling.

Until the end of June there is a fine exhibition within the Lapworth Museum of Geology at the University of Birmingham which showcases 50 years of highlights of drilling geological materials in the oceans.  Many of our insights into plate tectonics and climate evolution have stemmed from this work.

https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/lapworth-museum/events/exhibitions/2019/11March-MysteriesoftheDeep.aspx

 

12. Chepstow Rock ‘n’ Gem Show

On the weekend of 15th and 16th June 2019, Saturday 10 – 5pm and Sunday 10 – 4pm. There is a rock and gem show at Chepstow Racecourse with crystals, minerals, fossils and some jewellery. Admission for adults £4.50, seniors £2.00, children (8-16) £1.00, under 8s free.

 

13. WGCG Lecture Programme: 2019

Meetings are held on Wednesdays (usually 3rd of the month) and start at 7.30 p.m. in St Francis Church Hall, 110 Warwick Road, Kenilworth, CV8 1HL unless otherwise stated. Tea / coffee and biscuits are available beforehand from 7.00 p.m.  Please check the WGCG website for any late, unforeseeable changes at http://www.wgcg.co.uk/talks/

  • Saturday 22nd June 2019:  Bredon Hill Walk, led by Rod & Boo Vernon / Deborah Overton. Joint with BCGS. Use will be made of Apps.
  • Friday 12th July 2019: Malvern Hills Walk with Dick Bryant.
  • Wednesday 18th September 2019: Jurassic Sedimentation in Yorkshire with Andy Howards 7 -9 pm.

 

14. Teme Valley Geological Society (TVGS) Talks

Please find details of forthcoming TVGS evening talks held in Martley Memorial Hall (MMH). Talks commence at 7.30pm, fees are £3 for non-members and £1 for members.

  • Monday 16th September 2019: Members evening.

For further information of the TVGS please visit www.geo-village.eu

 

15. Malvern U3A Geology Group

The Malvern U3A Geology Group meets on the 2nd Wednesday of the month at the Cube, Malvern, from 10.00 – 12.00 am. The entrance price is: £2.00.

For further information please see website: www.malvernu3a.org.uk/geology3/

 

16. Woolhope Club

The Woolhope Club Geology Section meetings to be held in the “Woolhope Room” of the Library in Broad Street Hereford at 6.00pm for 6.30pm until 8.00pm. For further information of the Woolhope Club please visit www.woolhopeclub.org.uk

  • Friday 27th September 2019 – Paul Gannon on Snowdonia.
  • Friday 25th October 2019- To be arranged.
  • Saturday 2nd November 2019- Geologists Association (GA) Festival at University College London (UCL). Woolhope Club Members are most welcome. Note Saturday meeting.
  • Friday 22nd November 2019 – Paul Olver: A Tale of Five Magmas: A Review of Planetary volcanism.
  • Friday 13th December 2019 – Members’ Rock/Fossil Festival plus drinks in a nearby pub.

 

17. Black Country Geological Society (BCGS) Programme

BCGS indoor meetings are held at the Dudley Archives, Tipton Road, Dudley, DY1 4SQ with a 7.30 for 8.00 pm start unless stated otherwise. Visitors welcome, but there will be a charge of £1.00. For further details please see the website: http://bcgs.info

 

  • Saturday 15th June 2019: (Field Meeting): Lydney Cliffs, Gloucestershire: Led by John Moseley (Gloucestershire Geoconservation Trust). Meet 10.30am at Lydney Docks. Good parking at east end of Harbour Road, GR647013. Lunch in Lydney, or at Parkend, 2 miles north of Lydney. Afternoon: possible underground visit to Hopewell Colliery or Clearwell iron ore caves, or a Carboniferous limestone locality. Finish around 4.00pm. Bring a packed lunch or there may be an opportunity to buy lunch in Lydney or at the Forest of Dean VC.

 

  • Sunday 28th July 2019: (Field Meeting) Nottingham’s Sandstone Caves 10.45am – 4.00pm.  Nottingham’s Sandstone Caves, led by Tony Waltham. (Engineering geologist and karst specialist). Meet at 10.45am at bollards at the west end of Cliff Road, Nottingham, NG1 1GZ. Nearest car park is Lace Market Car Park, Pilcher Gate, NG1 1QE (about 100 yards to the north). Enter caves at 11.00am. The tour will take around one and a half hours. Please do not be late. Anyone arriving after 11.00am will not be able to join the cave tour. Numbers limited to 20. Helmets not needed. Torches needed for some parts. The caves are not suitable for wheelchairs or young children. Afterwards we will have a walk through the town to the Tunnel and Castle Rock, with a possible walk via the Church cemetery, time permitting. Aim to finish around 4.00pm.

 

Croft Castle Geology Champions – Geology walk Saturday 29th June 2019

The Croft Castle Geology Champions will again be conducting a guided geology walk next Saturday, 29th June, at Croft Castle.

We’ll be exploring two quarries in the Fishpool Valley. The formation and uses of the Aymestry Limestone (Silurian system) will be discussed, and there are a number of good specimens of brachiopods and other fossils to view.

We will then walk up the Ludlow Anticline to Croft Ambrey for a picnic lunch. Here we’ll see how the landscape has been shaped by the Pleistocene ice ages. We aim to be back at the tea room around 3pm.

During the walk, Robert Williams will speak of the pioneers of geology who had strong connections to this area, together with some aspects of the history of Croft Castle.

Ian Maxwell-Muller, who is a National Trust volunteer ranger at Croft, will explain some recent conservation work being carried out on the estate.

John Charles will show some simple demonstrations to illustrate the formation of limestone and its uses.

Following the walk, there will a geological exhibition in the tea room.

The walk is entitled “The Land Beneath Our Feet”, is organised by the National Trust, and costs £5 plus usual NT admission charges. There’s no need to book – but please arrive at Croft Castle reception by 10 am.

 

If you have anything you would like to include in our next monthly update please forward to eht@worc.ac.uk by 5th July 2019.

Herefordshire and Worcestershire Earth Heritage Trust, Geological Records Centre,

University of Worcester, Henwick Grove, Worcester, WR2 6AJ.

Tel: 01905 855184, Email: eht@worc.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 2019 news and update

1. Conserving Herefordshire’s Ice Age Ponds

The Development Stage for the Ice Age Ponds Project has now come to an end.  By the end of the Development Stage all the volunteers have helped complete a total of 41 surveys which exceeded our target of 30 by a long way.

The application, for the Delivery Stage of the project, to the National Lottery Heritage Fund was submitted on the 20th August. The decision will be known in November.  If the bid is successful it is likely that the project will get started again in January or February 2020.

But this isn’t quite the end of the project.  We couldn’t have done all this wonderful work without the amazing people who gave their time to survey ponds, let us visit their ponds and helped us find new ponds, research history and connect with landowners.  To say a huge “Thank You” we would like to invite you to our Project Celebration at Weobley Village Hall, Gadbridge Road, HR4 8SN, on Thursday 24th October from 2-4pm. As well as plenty of tea, coffee and cake we will have some displays showing some of the huge amount of data we collected and our plans for the future. Please let Beth know if you are coming (just so we have enough cake) by emailing e.andrews@worc.ac.uk.  We look forward to seeing you soon.’

Finally, a little reminder; If you have attended one of our training days but haven’t received your copy of “Kettle hole ponds survey method manual” please can you get in touch with Beth on e.andrews@worc.ac.uk and we can make sure one gets posted out to you.

2. Support EHT through the **NEW** Worcester Lottery

The Worcester Community Lottery has recently been launched by Worcester City Council and the EHT is one of its good causes. Half of the value of tickets sold through our page comes directly to us, with another 10% distributed to other local causes. One in 50 tickets wins a prize, with a prize maximum of £25,000.

So if you feel like a flutter on the lottery, please support the EHT by visiting our web page on the Worcester Lottery site:

https://www.worcesterlottery.org/support/herefordshire-worcestershire-earth-heritage-trust

You are invited to buy tickets on a weekly basis at one pound each, with a minimum commitment of one month (five tickets) and can cancel at any time after that. Good luck!

3. The Geopark Way Guidebook Launch and Walk – Saturday 28 July 2019

The Geopark Way new edition guidebook was launched very successfully at Ledbury Market House on Saturday 28 July, at an event from 11am – 1pm which was followed by a walk for 20 people, led by Geopark Way Warden, Alan Hughes, around the town and taking in a couple of local quarries showing different, locally sourced stone types in evidence in buildings in the town.

The launch event was opened by H&W EHT Chair, Ian Fairchild who introduced Ledbury’s Deputy Mayor, Councillor Dan Vesma, who very kindly welcomed visitors to the event, Ledbury and the Market House and gave a recital of a poem from locally born poet, John Masefield, about the landscape around Ledbury.

Ian Fairchild then talked about the inception of the Geopark Way, its roots in the Geopark movement, the geological background of the route and thanked the people who set it up, as well as acknowledging the people who enabled the new copy of the guidebook to be published and the Geopark Way Wardens who currently look after the Geopark Way, some of whom were in attendance on the day.

H&WEHT’s poet in residence, David Pamment (who also happens to be the Trust’s Finance Manager) delivered us his own composition dedicated to the Geopark Way, I am 109 miles, which told of the component parts which make up the entirety of the Geopark Way and summed it up extremely well, in poetic form, in the town which holds a renowned poetry festival every year which was more than fitting. (Poem included below on page 4-6)

Approximately 60 people came through the doors to see what we had to offer and the news release and launch event has spawned articles in a wide variety of magazines and publications which should spread the word of this unique 109 mile walking trail to a new audience and encourage people to walk the Geopark Way.

Now over 10 years old and recognised by Ordnance Survey, mapped across four counties and covering nearly 700 million years of geological time, the Geopark Way certainly deserves this recognition and the new guidebook enables you to learn about the landscape, heritage, culture, ecology and geology through maps, directions, descriptions, photographs and a handy glossary of terms you might need.

Visitors to the launch were able to pick up valuable information and engage with displays about EHT’s many other projects, buy items from the Trust’s engaging range of publications and gifts, as well as availing themselves of copies of the guidebook at a special launch.

To get your own copy and join us on the Geopark Way, go to the H&WEHT online shop at:  http://www.earthheritagetrust.org/pub/category/publications/geopark-way-associated publications/

Thank you to everyone from H&WEHT who helped to welcome visitors, serve drinks and sell merchandise at the launch and to those who spoke and led the 1.5 hour walk which made the event such an enjoyable and informative launch for the Geopark Way and its new guidebook.

 

ONE-OH-NINE MILES
A Ghost Written Autobiography of the Geopark Way.
Part One – How Long Am I?
Me?  I am one-oh-nine miles
I am Earth to space and down again
and halfway up once more,
I am more than twice the travel
Twixt cathedrals door to door,
Double the distance and then some
As the Whitmans’ falcons fly,
Yet only half the passage
Of the Severn sliding by.
I am the city of Gloucester to Worthing
or Bridgnorth to Morecambe Bay,
I am Worcester’s heart to Accrington
Or four tenths of the Pennine Way.
Two thirds of Wales’s  border,
Three halves of Hadrian’s wall,
Twice ‘cross London and partway back
‘Gherkin’, ‘Shard’ and all.
And I’m eight miles less than the M25,
My miles more mindful, you’ve no need to drive.
Me?  I am one-oh-nine miles.
Part Two – What Am I?
Me?  I am one-oh-nine miles;
I am more than one-oh-nine.
I am 17, the sections into which I’m divided.
And 6.4, the average miles of those 17.
I am 4.3, the miles from Ledbury to Holly Bush,
And also 8.2, the miles from Minsterworth to Gloucester.
I am 3, my offspring, my circular walks,
And I am 4, the counties through which I pass.
I am  84, my points of geological interest
And also 187, the way points along The Way.
I am 425, the height in meters of the Worcestershire Beacon,
And also 338, the meterage of its Herefordshire companion.
I am 680 million, the age of my oldest rocks
And also 200 million, the age of my youngest.
I am 450, the millennia since my gravels were laid,
And 17 once more, the volunteer Wardens who ward The Way.
Also, I am 10, the years since I came into existence.
I am villages and towns and a city,
Castles, a cathedral and churches.
I am apps and apparitions, cream teas and turkeys,
An obelisk and towers, steam trains and pubs.
I am cliffs and caves, cuttings and canals,
Faults and intrusions, meadows and mounds.
I am quarries and coalmines, bridges and tracks,
Escarpments and plateaus and floodplains.
I am forests and woodland, valleys and hills,
Springs and rivers and a world renowned bore.
I am cattle grids and kissing gates and lines crossing fields,
I am roads , bridleways and footpaths,
The ‘Ordinance Survey’ knows what I am.
I am Triassic and  Jurassic,
I am Permian and Precambrian,
Cambrian and Carboniferous;
I am Silurian times two.
I’ve been ice and volcanoes and deserts,
I’ve been warm seas and rain forest.
I am sandstone and limestone,
Siltstone and mudstone.
I am granite and shale and sand,
Coal and gravel and quartz.
I am conglomerate and breccia.
I am these and so many others.
I am footprints and fossils.
I am bivalves and gastropods,
Brachiopods and corals,
Cephalopods and crinoids.
I am Dalmanites, the Sigel that shows you the way.
I am rocks and landscape and heritage.
I am knowledge and discovery and well-being.
Me? I am one-oh-nine miles,
What am I to you?

©David M Pamment 2019

 

 


4. Map and Resources Training Day

Interest has been expressed in us holding another iteration of our maps and resources training day, which has been delivered successfully three times in 2019.  We cover access to publicly available electronic map resources, the maps and literature resources available at the EHT for members and affiliated group members, and access to definitive aerial photographs, modern and historical OS maps and geological maps with an EHT staff member.  If you would like to attend a future day, please let Allison Tinsley know and we will set a mutually convenient date.

The next step for those who want to make the most of maps is to learn about a Geographic Information System (GIS).  The freely available software QGIS has amazing capabilities and has been used extensively in the Herefordshire Ponds project.  We plan to offer GIS training towards the end of the year for those who have completed the maps and resources training day.

 

5. Kington Walking Festival 19-22 September 2019

The Walking Festival returns for its eighth year, please see the link to the programme below:

https://www.kingtonwalks.org/images/Documents/2019_Festival_Brochure_vWebsite.pdf

 

6. More on Worcestershire River Terraces

The August newsletter mentioned the very brief exposure of a river terrace at Bevere, just north of Worcester. We referred to it as ‘the Worcester terrace’, which was at best misleading, for which we apologise.

The River Severn terrace deposits are referred as ‘Members’ of the Severn Valley Formation, and this is the Holt Heath Sand and Gravel Member. At Bevere, its base is about 8m above the river flood plain and it is 5 or more metres thick. Here, the outside bend of the river is actively cutting through the Mercia Mudstone bedrock, forming a very steep, 10m high bank, capped with the sand and gravel of the Holt Heath terrace. The bank is inaccessible and covered with trees, so that only the occasional landslide reveals the underlying deposits, visible from the far bank.

Here is a close-up of a small part of the Holt Heath Member at Bevere, captured before it was covered up.

River terraces are most obvious as features of the landscape, forming areas of flat land at different heights with relatively steep slopes between them. The landforms are numbered from the lowest upwards and of the six Severn terraces, three can be seen in the vicinity of Bevere weir. The exposure just described forms terrace 3 and is on the left (eastern) bank of the river a few hundred metres upstream from the weir.

The buildings of Bevere Green farm, just East of the weir, are on Terrace 2, 10m above the flood plain. This terrace was formed after the river had cut down through the Holt Heath member and through some of the underlying bedrock. As with all the terraces, the sand and gravel was deposited by fast flowing rivers as glaciers melted.  This is the Worcester Member.

The Camp House Inn on the right bank of the river is located on Terrace number 1, lying only a few metres above the current flood plain.  This terrace is composed of the Power House Member. It is the lowest and the most recently formed of all the terraces, with gravel deposited in fast flowing rivers from the last of the melting ice.

Note that the other river terrace mentioned in the August newsletter belongs to the separately-named River Avon terrace system.

Upcoming Events

7. WGCG Lecture Programme: 2019

Meetings are held on Wednesdays (usually 3rd of the month) and start at 7.30 p.m. in St Francis Church Hall, 110 Warwick Road, Kenilworth, CV8 1HL unless otherwise stated. Tea / coffee and biscuits are available beforehand from 7.00 p.m.  Please check the WGCG website for any late, unforeseeable changes at http://www.wgcg.co.uk/talks/

  • Wednesday 18th September 2019: Yorkshires Ancient Storms – Andy Howard
  • Thursday 10th October 2019: AGM
  • Wednesday 20th November 2019: ‘The Real Value of Microfossils’ – Haydon Bailey

 

8. Teme Valley Geological Society (TVGS) Talks

Please find details of forthcoming TVGS evening talks held in Martley Memorial Hall (MMH). Talks commence at 7.30pm, fees are £3 for non-members and £1 for members.

  • Monday 16th September 2019: Members evening.
  • Monday 21st October 2019: Prof. Yan Lavallee – Volcanoes and Experiments
  • Monday 18th November 2019: TBC Dr Chris Davies – Powering the Earth’s Magnetic Field over Geological Time
  • Monday 20th January 2020: Prof. Ian Fairchild – Caves, Caves’ Atmospheres and Caves Climates

For further information of the TVGS please visit www.geo-village.eu

 

9. Malvern U3A Geology Group

The Malvern U3A Geology Group meets on the 2nd Wednesday of the month at the Cube, Malvern, from 10.00 – 12.00 am. The entrance price is: £2.00.

For further information please see website: www.malvernu3a.org.uk/geology3/

For people who are members of the Malvern U3A and would like to develop skills which could be useful in identifying items below ground, there is now an Introduction to Dowsing group within Malvern U3A.

The group is run by Ced Jackson who set up Malvern Dowsers (now 10 years old), and meets once a month on a Tuesday afternoon in Malvern.  For more information please contact Info@CedJackson.org (01684 560265).

 

10. Woolhope Club

The Woolhope Club Geology Section meetings to be held in the “Woolhope Room” of the Library in Broad Street Hereford at 6.00pm for 6.30pm until 8.00pm. For further information of the Woolhope Club please visit www.woolhopeclub.org.uk

  • Friday 27th September 2019 – Paul Gannon on Snowdonia.
  • Friday 25th October 2019- To be arranged.
  • Saturday 2nd November 2019- Geologists Association (GA) Festival at University College London (UCL). Woolhope Club Members are most welcome. Note Saturday meeting.
  • Friday 22nd November 2019 – Paul Olver: A Tale of Five Magmas: A Review of Planetary volcanism.
  • Friday 13th December 2019 – Members’ Rock/Fossil Festival plus drinks in a nearby pub.

 

11. Black Country Geological Society (BCGS) Programme

BCGS indoor meetings are held at the Dudley Archives, Tipton Road, Dudley, DY1 4SQ with a 7.30 for 8.00 pm start unless stated otherwise. Visitors welcome, but there will be a charge of £1.00. For further details please see the website: http://bcgs.info

Friday 13 – Monday 16 September (Field Meeting): BCGS trip to Dorset. Led by the Dorset Geological Society. Organised spaces on this visit have now been filled. Any further members wishing to attend will need to make their own arrangements and let the field secretary know.

Monday 16 September (Indoor Meeting): ‘How and why Earth’s land ice cover is changing’. Speaker: Dr Nicholas Barrand (Lecturer in Geosciences, University of Birmingham). The talk will explore the impact of these changes on global sea levels and downstream systems, utilising airborne and satellite remote sensing tools.

 

Saturday 5 October (Geoconservation Day): Saltwells Local Nature Reserve. Meet at the Nature Reserve car park (Grid ref: SJ 934 868) on Saltwells Lane at 10.30. Wear old work clothes, waterproofs and stout footwear or wellies. Please bring gloves and garden tools (hand brushes, trowels, loppers, secateurs, forks and spades if you have them). Either bring packed lunch or hot food can be acquired from the Saltwells Inn adjacent to the car park. Finish at 2.30.

 

Monday 21 October (Indoor Meeting): ‘A Geological Grand Tour of the Solar System’. Speaker: Andrew Lound. A tour of the solar system taking us on a journey from the sun to the far outreaches of the solar system, along the way visiting planets, moons, asteroids and comets. Illustrated with the very latest images and supplemented by music.

 

Saturday 2 November (Geoconservation Day): Details TBC.

 

Saturday 16 November (Field Meeting): An Introduction to Castle Hill. Led by Ian Beech (Wren’s Nest Nature Reserve). Meet at 10.00 in the Wren’s Nest wardens’ office, Fossil View, off Wren’s Hill Road, Dudley, DY1 3SB. After tea/coffee, walk from the wardens’ base to Castle Hill via Bluebell Wood. We will be visiting managed and unmanaged sites, looking at outcrops and logging areas with any findings. Many of the outcrops are similar to Wrens’ Nest so we should be able to make a comparison along with a general introduction to the site.

 

Monday 18 November (Indoor Meeting): ‘Minerals of the English Midlands’. Speaker: Roy Starkey. This talk explores the rich mineralogical heritage of the area, setting this into a regional,

historical and economic context, and tracing the development of mineral exploitation from earliest times to the present day. Mineral specimens from the area are recognised as being significant on a global scale, and are to be found in all major mineral collections, both within the UK and abroad.

 

Saturday 7 December (Geoconservation Day): Barrow Hill (TBC). Directed by the Barrow Hill LNR warden. Meet on Vicarage Lane off High Street, Pensnett (A4101), at the top end near to the nature reserve and St. Marks Church, at 10.30. The day will involve vegetation clearance in the East Quarry. Wear old clothing and stout boots or wellies. Please bring gloves and tools if you can, i.e. brushes, trowels, loppers, saws, rakes etc. Safety glasses and hard hats will be provided where necessary. Bring a packed lunch and hot drink. We will aim to finish around 2.30.

 

Monday 16 December (Indoor Meeting, 7.00 for 7.30 start): Members’ Evening and Christmas Social. This is our annual chance for members to share their geological experiences in a sociable atmosphere with a Christmas buffet provided by the Society. Contributions needed from you!

We need a few of you to volunteer to do a short presentation – on any topic with geological connections; or perhaps bring some of your specimens for admiration, discussion and identification. Please contact Keith Elder if you can contribute to this event: meetingsecretary@bcgs.info

 

 

If you have anything you would like to include in our next monthly update please forward to eht@worc.ac.uk by 4th October 2019.

Herefordshire and Worcestershire Earth Heritage Trust, Geological Records Centre,

University of Worcester, Henwick Grove, Worcester, WR2 6AJ.

Tel: 01905 855184, Email: eht@worc.ac.uk

 

 

Events August 2017

BBC Country File Live

Thursday 3rd to Sunday 6th August 2017

Come and joins us in the Wild Life Zone at BBC Country File Live on Saturday 5th and Sunday 6th August 2017.  Set in 100 acres of Blenheim Palace’s beautiful parkland, the show brings together the best of the British countryside from live arena shows, animal displays and farming in action to outdoor activities and sports,  fine foods and country clothing.

 

Fortis Family Fun Day

Friday 18th August 2017

Enjoy an afternoon of  family fun from 1.30-3.30 pm at Ledbury Deer Park and take part in the activities on the Earth Heritage Trust stand including the Dinosaur Detective Trail.

 

Fortis Family Fun Day

Friday 25th  August 2017

An afternoon’s family fun from 1.30 -4.00 pm,  including the Earth Heritage Trust Dinosaur Detective Trail at The Oasis Academy in Warndon, Worcester.

Events July 2017

Saturday 1st July 2017

Malvern Science in the Park, Priory Park, Great Malvern from 10.30 am to 4.30pm

Join us for a fun and exciting day exploring the wonders of science and technology. The event is free to attend with activities for all the family. The EHT stand and Dinosaur Detective Trail activities will be there. Any volunteers are very welcome. For further information please visit: www.innovatemalvern.com/science-in-park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Events June 2017

Sunday 25th June 2017: Rocks & Landscape of Eastern Herefordshire

A geology and landscape walk, including a look at the building stones of the prominent buildings along the way. From Colwall, we will follow the approximate path of the Geopark Way Trail and end the walk at Ledbury Station. The walk will be taken at a moderate pace to allow ample opportunity to view and discuss the landscape features. For further information and bookings, please visit: www.walkingfestival.com and click on the Programme and Walk 42.

GeoFest 2017

This years GeoFest runs from 27th May to 3rd September 2017 and includes guided walks, children’s activities, tours, exhibitions and much more. You can download the leaflet here – GeoFest 2017 leaflet and start planning some exciting days and evenings out. For further information go to: http://geopark.org.uk/

Events May 2017

Saturday 6th May 2017: The Land Beneath Your Feet – Geology Walk. Croft Castle.

Croft Castle Champions Group. Explore the beautiful Fishpool Valley, with its two quarries, and walk to the summit of Croft Ambrey, a notable Iron Age Hill Fort. See and handle the Aymestry Limestone, enjoy breathtaking views and learn all about the geological features and significance of the landscape. For further information and bookings, please visit: www.nationaltrust.org.uk/croft-castle-and-parkland/whats-on and click on ‘The Land Beneath Your Feet – Geology Walk’.

 

Events April 2017

Thursday 13th April 2017: Rock and Fossil Roadshow at CountryTastic, The Three Counties Showground.

Earth Heritage Trust will be collaborating with Gloucestershire Geology Trust to run a Rock and Fossil Roadshow at CountryTastic. For further information, please visit http://www.threecounties.co.uk/countrytastic/

 

Sunday 30th April 2017: Tiddesley Wood Spring Open Day.

Earth Heritage Trust will again have a stand at this year’s Tiddesley Wood Spring Open Day. For further information, please visit www.tiddesley.org.uk

 

Events March 2017

Thursday 16th March 2017: The Hive’s Science Night 2017, The Hive. Worcester.

British Science Week. 16:30 to 19:30. Earth Heritage Trust will have an information stand at The Hive’s Science Night. We will also be running geology-related children’s activities.